APRENDIENDO DE LAS VEGAS ROBERT VENTURI PDF

Translated into 18 languages, the book helped foster the postmodernism art movement. That following fall, the two created a research studio for graduate students at Yale School of Art and Architecture. Izenour, a graduate student in the studio, accompanied his senior tutor colleagues, Venturi and Scott Brown, to Las Vegas in together with nine students of architecture and four planning and graphics students to study the urban form of the city. Las Vegas was regarded as a "non-city" and as an outgrowth of a "strip", along which were placed parking lots and singular frontages for gambling casinos, hotels, churches and bars. The research group studied various aspects of the city, including the commercial vernacular, lighting, patterns, styles, and symbolism in the architecture. Venturi and Scott Brown created a taxonomy for the forms, signs, and symbols they encountered.

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Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Want to Read saving…. Want to Read Currently Reading Read. Other editions. Enlarge cover. Error rating book. Refresh and try again. Open Preview See a Problem? Details if other :. Thanks for telling us about the problem. Return to Book Page. Steven Izenour. Denise Scott Brown. Editorial Reviews - Learning from Las Vegas From the Publisher Learning from Las Vegas created a healthy controversy on its appearance in , calling for architects to be more receptive to the tastes and values of "common" people and less immodest in their erections of "heroic," self-aggrandizing monuments.

This revision includes the full texts of Part I of the original, Editorial Reviews - Learning from Las Vegas From the Publisher Learning from Las Vegas created a healthy controversy on its appearance in , calling for architects to be more receptive to the tastes and values of "common" people and less immodest in their erections of "heroic," self-aggrandizing monuments. This revision includes the full texts of Part I of the original, on the Las Vegas strip, and Part II, "Ugly and Ordinary Architecture, or the Decorated Shed," a generalization from the findings of the first part on symbolism in architecture and the iconography of urban sprawl.

The final part of the first edition, on the architectural work of the firm Venturi and Rauch, is not included in the revision. The new paperback edition has a smaller format, fewer pictures, and a considerably lower price than the original. There are an added preface by Scott Brown and a bibliography of writings by the members of Venturi and Rauch and about the firm's work.

Synopsis Learning from Las Vegas created a healthy controversy on its appearance in , calling for architects to be more receptive to the tastes and values of "common" people and less immodest in their erections of "heroic," self-aggrandizing monuments.

About Author: Biography Steven Izenour Get A Copy. Paperback , Revised , pages. More Details Original Title. United States of America. Other Editions Friend Reviews. To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about Learning from Las Vegas , please sign up. Be the first to ask a question about Learning from Las Vegas. Lists with This Book. Community Reviews. Showing Average rating 3. Rating details. More filters.

Sort order. Nov 06, Jimmy rated it really liked it Shelves: architecture. Venturi has undoubtedly become the black sheep of late twentieth-century architecture. This book is part of the reason why. It's a rather bold, almost crass statement about the askew focus of Modern architecture.

He compares Rome to Las Vegas, not to mention the fact that he introduced postmodern irony into architectural perspectives, which the classicists and the moderns probably weren't too thrilled about.

His symbolical relativism more or less diminishes every formal masterpiece ever construc Venturi has undoubtedly become the black sheep of late twentieth-century architecture. His symbolical relativism more or less diminishes every formal masterpiece ever constructed, and he praises Las Vegas for being the ideal architectural environment for efficiently accommodating urban automobile culture.

Social concern, in the context of city planning is completely absent from this text. In a way, Venturi's text is written by that of a complete postmodern provocateur, single-handedly justifying ugliness in architecture "after modernism". Billboards, or those big flashy neon signs that sin city is so well known for function as symbolic representations of what a particular building or structure is trying to say. Ugliness is efficient here because it represents the point of the value of the building; what it does, what is sold within, what people go to this building for.

Venturi calls for the ordinary over the beautiful in approaches to a new architecture because he feels that the time period calls for it. He expresses it somewhat well in the following passage. Because this is not the time and ours is not the environment for heroic communication through pure architecture.

Each medium has its day, and the rhetorical environmental statements of our time-civic, commercial,or residential-will come from media more purely symbolic, perhaps less static and more adaptable to the scale of our environment. The iconography and mixed media of roadside commercial architecture will point the way, if we will look. I suppose that eyesores are eyesores for a reason. Venturi's text is certainly influential, even if it is dated.

Frederic Jameson, a thinker bound to confuse readers about what Venturi was actually trying to say more than anyone else, was enormously influenced by him. We can also see in this sort of reasoning that attempt to bridge the gap between high and low art that has become so typical of the postmodern sensibility. The specter of Adorno certainly lingers.

But maybe Venturi was onto something a little more useful than his postmodern contemporaries, something a little more important than a bunch of neo-marxist theorizing and empty talk about cultural hegemony. It seems to me that he was merely attempting to show people how to reevaluate ugliness with a sympathetic eye.

This book is full of suggestions, and to me the most important when in an architectural sense was to see the metaphorical or symbolical value of these structures and their usefulness. The book's ideas are unquestionably dated, but its relevance and revolutionary value should not be taken for granted. View all 7 comments. Jul 05, Em "Reacher" rated it really liked it Shelves: not-jack-reacher. Don't be surprised if Jack Reacher suddenly shows up at the goodreads. Consider this a firm premonition.

View 1 comment. Feb 28, Paul rated it really liked it. It wants to be realistic in a world where architects can be fantasists. It recognizes the necessity in building for people as they are, not imagining people as we want them to be. And it seems to overlook the idea of beauty as a noble end worth pursuing; the very element of delight that they claim the Modernists forgot about.

And, unsurprisingly, sometimes the authors come across as a bit too intellectual for their own good.

I think this one will stick with my for a while. Feb 10, Erik Carter rated it it was amazing. Essential book 4 dezigners. Not sure if I like it more than "Complexity and Contradiction" but it's still pretty great. Jun 07, Claudia rated it did not like it Shelves: design.

I was disappointed. And some of my disappointment may come from familiarity with many of the authors' basic arguments--they're not new to me, which isn't really this book's fault then again, I did not have t I was disappointed. And some of my disappointment may come from familiarity with many of the authors' basic arguments--they're not new to me, which isn't really this book's fault then again, I did not have that reaction when I recently read Jane Jacobs' The Death and Life of Great American Cities , and I'm well acquainted with her ideas.

But really, much of this just seemed boring and superficial. Indeed, I showed an illustration to my husband, and when he read the paragraph he said, "Well, that's really stating the obvious, isn't it? Jun 22, Michelle Llewellyn rated it liked it. Had to read this for my Theories of Popular Culture class for English.

The best thing about this book are the old photos of the now "Old" Las Vegas Strip. I especially enjoyed comparing the aerial photos of the Strip to modern day Google Map and Wiki images.

Venturi's duck and decorated shed were also fun to learn about and our teacher encouraged us to examine our own city for similar architectural theory. I learned a lot. Nov 05, Fred rated it liked it. Jul 02, Melissa rated it it was amazing.

I still think about this one all the time, years later. Mar 24, Anima rated it it was amazing. A book that beautifully presents Las Vegas' tangible architectural elements and gives us insightful views of the overall display of rigid shapes ranging from an outward to an inward perspective.

The poetry does not matter' But both are enclosed: The former has no windows, and the latter is open only to the sky.

The combination of darkness and enclosure of the gambling room and its subspaces makes for privacy, protection, concentration, and control. The intricate maze under the low ceiling never connects with outside light or outside space. This disorients the occupant in space and time.

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Learning from Las Vegas: The Forgotten Symbolism of Architectural Form

Which building is better, the duck or the ornamented shed? More importantly, what kind of architecture does the average American prefer? In their landmark publication Learning From Las Vegas , Denise Scott Brown and Robert Venturi probed these questions by turning their back on paternalistic modernism in favor of the glowing, overtly kitsch, and symbolic Mecca of the Las Vegas strip. Following a clandestine interaction following a meeting to discuss the destruction of the Library of Fine Arts at the University of Pensilvania—where Scott Brown and Venturi taught—the pair discovered their shared interest in the historic and ornamental. Both were fond of decorative architecture and soon began sharing research and even teaching alongside one another.

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Aprendiendo De Las Vegas Robert Venturi

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