LISA ROFEL DESIRING CHINA PDF

Lisa Rofel is an American anthropologist, specialising in feminist anthropology and gender studies. She received a B. Desiring China "examines the ways in which analyses of public culture in China offer new ways to read desire", [4] and was described by Patti Duncan in the NWSA Journal as "an exciting and important new work that pushes the boundaries of ethnography". Other Modernities studies three generations of female silk workers in a factory in Hangzhou , comparing the social attitudes of each generation - those who entered work during the Chinese Communist Revolution , those who grew up during the Cultural Revolution , and those who grew up during the reign of Deng Xiaoping. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. American anthropologist.

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More about this series. Author: Lisa Rofel. Drawing on her research over the past two decades among urban residents and rural migrants in Hangzhou and Beijing, Rofel analyzes the meanings that individuals attach to various public cultural phenomena and what their interpretations say about their understandings of post-socialist China and their roles within it. She locates the first broad-based public debate about post-Mao social changes in the passionate dialogues about the popular television soap opera Yearnings.

Desiring China is undoubtedly a desirable contribution to the anthropological study of China. Consequently, it should appeal to a broad anthropological audience. I highly recommend it to anyone interested in these areas of inquiry. It deserves a broad audience in cultural studies, anthropology, queer and feminist theory, Asian studies, and contemporary theory.

With wit and sparkle, Lisa Rofel introduces us to young Chinese who live for the moment, experimenting with sex, love, and cosmopolitanism, without ever forgetting their love of culture and of nation. Desiring China is an exciting work of cultural interpretation, and it is an innovative guide for studying the cultural practices and political possibilities in globalizing China.

Bk Cover Image Full. Sign In. Search Cart. Search for:. Book Pages: Illustrations: Published: May In a study at once ethnographic, historical, and theoretical, she contends that neoliberal subjectivities are created through the production of various desires—material, sexual, and affective—and that it is largely through their engagements with public culture that people in China are imagining and practicing appropriate desires for the post-Mao era.

Paperback Cloth. Availability: In stock. Add to cart. Open Access. Request a desk or exam copy. Table of Contents Back to Top. Acknowledgments ix Introduction 1 1. Yearnings: Televisual Love and Melodramatic Politics 31 2. Qualities of Desire: Imagining Gay Identities 85 4.

Rights Back to Top. Awards Back to Top. Additional Information Back to Top. Publicity material Bk Cover Image Full. Also Viewed. Queer Phenomenology. Staying with the Trouble. Vibrant Matter. The Queer Art of Failure. Meeting the Universe Halfway. Designs for the Pluriverse. Cruel Optimism. Living a Feminist Life. Security is a defining characteristic of our age and the driving force behind the management of collective political, economic, and social life. Directed at Made in China. As China has evolved into an industrial powerhouse over the past two decades, a new class of workers has developed: the dagongmei, or working girls.

The Promise of Infrastructure. From U. Roads, electricity lines, water pipes, The Queer Art of Failure is about finding alternatives—to conventional understandings of success in a heteronormative, capitalist society; to academic

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Lisa Rofel

National Library of Australia. Search the catalogue for collection items held by the National Library of Australia. Read more Rofel, Lisa. Desiring China : experiments in neoliberalism, sexuality, and public culture.

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Desiring China

More about this series. Author: Lisa Rofel. Drawing on her research over the past two decades among urban residents and rural migrants in Hangzhou and Beijing, Rofel analyzes the meanings that individuals attach to various public cultural phenomena and what their interpretations say about their understandings of post-socialist China and their roles within it. She locates the first broad-based public debate about post-Mao social changes in the passionate dialogues about the popular television soap opera Yearnings. Desiring China is undoubtedly a desirable contribution to the anthropological study of China. Consequently, it should appeal to a broad anthropological audience. I highly recommend it to anyone interested in these areas of inquiry.

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Through window displays, newspapers, soap operas, gay bars, and other public culture venues, Chinese citizens are negotiating what it means to be cosmopolitan citizens of the world, with appropriate needs, aspirations, and longings. In a study at once ethnographic, historical, and theoretical, she contends that neoliberal subjectivities are created through the production of various desires—material, sexual, and affective—and that it is largely through their engagements with public culture that people in China are imagining and practicing appropriate desires for the post-Mao era. Drawing on her research over the past two decades among urban residents and rural migrants in Hangzhou and Beijing, Rofel analyzes the meanings that individuals attach to various public cultural phenomena and what their interpretations say about their understandings of post-socialist China and their roles within it. She locates the first broad-based public debate about post-Mao social changes in the passionate dialogues about the popular television soap opera Yearnings. Sign In or Create an Account. Advanced Search. User Tools.

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Drawing on her research over the past two decades among urban residents and rural migrants in Hangzhou and Beijing, Rofel analyzes the meanings that individuals attach to various public cultural phenomena and what their interpretations say about their understandings of post-socialist China and their roles within it. She locates the first broad-based public debate about post-Mao social changes in the passionate dialogues about the popular television soap opera Yearnings. Compared to Aihwa Ong, for instance, I think this is already solid stuff. It was to Rofel's credit that she noticed how central the public culture is in life in China. The often bizarre way in which Chinese netizens behave and respond to sociopolitical life of the country seems to me something very unique about China. In a sense then, though a vast country, individual citizens' experience of china are often remarkably unitary.

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