DISCOURSE NETWORKS KITTLER PDF

Friedrich A. This is a highly original book about the connections between historical moment, social structure, technology, communication systems, and what is said and thought using these systems - notably literature. The author focuses on the differences between 'discourse networks' in and in , in the process developing a new analysis of the shift from romanticism to modernism. The work might be classified as a German equivalent to the New Historicism that is currently of great interest among American literary scholars, both in the intellectual influences to which Kittler responds and in his concern to ground literature in the most concrete details of historical reality. The artful structure of the book begins with Goethe's Faust and ends with Vale;ry's Faust. In the section, the author discusses how language was learned, the emergence of the modern university, the associated beginning of the interpretation of contemporary literature, and the canonization of literature.

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Friedrich A. This is a highly original book about the connections between historical moment, social structure, technology, communication systems, and what is said and thought using these systems - notably literature.

The author focuses on the differences between 'discourse networks' in and in , in the process developing a new analysis of the shift from romanticism to modernism. The work might be classified as a German equivalent to the New Historicism that is currently of great interest among American literary scholars, both in the intellectual influences to which Kittler responds and in his concern to ground literature in the most concrete details of historical reality.

The artful structure of the book begins with Goethe's Faust and ends with Vale;ry's Faust. In the section, the author discusses how language was learned, the emergence of the modern university, the associated beginning of the interpretation of contemporary literature, and the canonization of literature. The section argues that the new discourse network in which literature is situated in the modern period is characterized by new technological media - film, the photograph, and the typewritten page - and the crisis that these caused for literary production.

Learning to Read in 27 Motherliness and Civil Service. Authors Readers Authors. Feminine Reader and the Kingdom. Technological Media. Afterword to the Second Printing. Works Cited. Index of Persons. Fichte Kafka Kittler's language learned letters Lindhorst literary literature longer material meaning medium method minimal signifieds mother Mother's Mouth nature network of 18oo Nietzsche Nietzsche's nonsense once pedagogical philosophical phonograph poem poet poetic Poetry possible post-structuralism primers produced psychoanalysis psychophysics reading remains Rilke Romantic Romanticism Schlegel Schreber script sense sentence Serpentina sexes signs simply soul sound speak speech Spirit Stefan George Stephani syllables tachistoscope thought tion translation transposition typewriter unconscious universal voice woman women words writing written.

Prelude in the Theater.

AUDIOPHONY OCTAVE PDF

Friedrich Kittler obituary

Instead, for Kittler, Dracula is a story about media machines and the technologies of writing. In short, Kittler approaches Dracula as he approaches all literature: he reads it as science fiction. His work continually reveals such unlikely texts as Dracula , the tales of E. In his hands, these disparate fictions become accounts of interactions between humans and machines in a defamiliarized, technologically saturated world. While Kittler is, as he periodically insists, a literary critic, in his writings literature always functions as part of a more general technological and cultural matrix. It occupies a slightly uneasy position, therefore.

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Kittler, Friedrich. Michael Metteer. First of all, there is no reading Kittler quickly. Kittler notes that Foucault ended his archaeology of discourse around , just before things got going with the second industrial revolution and the expansion of media technologies -- typewriter, gramophone, and film each contributing to a medial turn Foucault does not address. The German title Aufschreibesysteme arguably translates more accurately as "notation systems" or "inscription systems"; provided that Kittler does relatively little with the idea of "network", " inscription systems " seems like a better fit with what's here.

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